9 Helpful Dog Training Tips

1. Freedom

A new dog should gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that some pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to unwanted behaviors relating to house-training and destructive chewing. Be sure to close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if and when necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him or her.

2. Be Generous with Your Affection

Make sure you give your dog lots of attention when they are doing the right thing. Reward them when they have been good. That’s the time to be extra generous with your attention and praise. It’s even okay to be a little over the top.

woman-playing-with-her-adult-dalmatian-1390075

3. Find Out What He Or She Really Likes

Realize that just because the product online says “treats that all dogs love” doesn’t necessarily mean your dog will love it. Some dogs are selective about what they like to eat. Soft and chewy treats are usually more exciting for your dog than hard and crunchy ones. Take note about what he or she likes.

4. Tell Your Dog What You Want Him Or Her to Do

There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do instead. Dogs don’t generalize like humans do, if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the right side instead of the left. A better alternative would be to tell him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion. As well as to establish your role as the leader of the pack. Always remember to be “calm and assertive.” -Ceasar Milan (The Dog Whisperer)

man-wearing-black-and-brown-fur-hoodie-jacket-and-blue-pants-159557

5. Consistency is Key

Whenever you’re training a dog, it is essential to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone is on the same page. If you are telling your dog “get down” when she jumps on the bed and your spouse is saying “off,” while your live in grandmother is letting her lay around up there, how in the world is she ever going to learn what she should do? Consistency with boundaries, rules and limitations across the board will be the key to your success in having a well mannered and well trained dog.

6. Be Sure To Keep Realistic Expectations

Shifting bad and unwanted behaviors takes time. Be sure to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to take into consideration how long your dog has had the habit of any particular behavior. For example; if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last 6 years and now you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a puppy. Remember it’s never too late to change or shift the behavior, some will just take longer than others. This is where patience and consistency come in.

agility-animal-blur-canine-260440

7. We Get What We Reinforce…

Not Necessarily What We Want. If your dog exhibits a behavior you don’t like, there is a strong likelihood that it’s something that has been reinforced before. A great example is when your dog brings you a toy and barks to entice you to throw it. You throw the toy. Your dog has just learned that barking gets you to do what he wants. You say “no,” and he barks even more. Heaven forbid you give in and throw the toy now! Why?  Simply because you will have taught him that persistence pays off. Then before you know it you’ll have a dog that barks and barks every time he or she wants something. The solution to this? Ignore the barking or ask your dog to do something for you, like: (“sit”) before you throw their toy.

8. Freedom

A new dog should gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that some pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to unwanted behaviors relating to house-training and destructive chewing. Be sure to close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if and when necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him or her.

dalmatian-sitting-white-surface-933498

9. Listen to Your Dog

When you have a bond with a dog you learn to listen to him or her. If your dog shows signs of being uncomfortable when meeting another dog, animal or person, don’t insist that he say hello or try to force them to be social. He or she is telling you that they aren’t comfortable for a reason, and you should respect that. Forcing the issue and not being attentive in this direction can often result in bigger problems down the line.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.